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Age

Age is a protected ground under the Code, This means that you cannot be discriminated against because of your age where you work or live, or go to get a service. In the Code, age is defined as being 18 years or older, or age 16 or older in housing if you have withdrawn from parental control.

Some special programs and benefits, such as seniors’ discounts or youth employment programs, exist to address genuine age-related needs. However, when you are unjustifiably treated differently because of your age, that's age discrimination

Relevant policy:

  1. From research to legislation: Challenging public perceptions and getting results

    September 2005 - This paper, prepared by the Ontario Human Rights Commission (Canada), is for presentation at a panel session of the International Symposium on Age Discrimination being held September 5, 2005 in London, England. The theme of the session is “Beyond legislation – achieving cultural and attitudinal change” and has as its objectives.

  2. Submission of the Ontario Human Rights Commission to the Ministry of Labour regarding the consultations on ending mandatory retirement

    September 2004 - This submission is in response to the Ministry of Labour’s public consultation on ending mandatory retirement.The Ontario Human Rights Commission (“OHRC”) commends the Ministry for these steps towards ending mandatory retirement.
  3. Age discrimination and transit (fact sheet)

    2002 - Under the Ontario Human Rights Code, transit service providers have a legal responsibility to ensure that transit systems are accessible to all Ontarians. Many older persons depend of public transit services to go to work, to get to medical appointments, to go to the grocery store, to participate in recreational activities and to visit family and friends. Transit services that are not accessible can cause isolation and prevent participation of older persons in our communities.

  4. Ageism and age discrimination (fact sheet)

    2002 - Ageism is often a cause for individual acts of age discrimination and also discrimination that is more systemic in nature, such as in the design and implementation of services, programs and facilities. Age discrimination involves treating persons in an unequal fashion due to age in a way that is contrary to human rights law. The Ontario Human Rights Code prohibits age discrimination in: employment, housing accommodation, goods, services and facilities, contracts and membership in trade and vocational associations.

  5. Policy on discrimination against older people because of age

    February 2007 - This policy sets out the OHRC’s position on discrimination against older persons as it relates to the provisions of the Code. It deals only with issues that fall within Parts I and II of the Code and that could form the basis of a human rights claim. Time for Action contains a broader examination of social policy and other issues which must be addressed through positive action by government and community partners. In addition, the OHRC is engaged in, and will continue to undertake, initiatives to address broader human rights issues related to age.
  6. Consultation report: Human rights issues in insurance

    October 2001 - In October 1999, the Ontario Human Rights Commission released a Discussion Paper for public consultation entitled Human Rights Issues in Insurance. This Consultation Report summarizes comments and viewpoints that were communicated to the Commission. The Report also examines possible directions to ensure human rights issues in insurance continue to receive attention in the future. A summary of relevant Code sections and selected case law is included in the appendices.
  7. Time for action: Advancing human rights for older Ontarians

    June 2001 - Time For Action: Advancing the Rights of Older Persons in Ontario is the final Report on the Ontario Human Rights Commission's extensive research and consultation on human rights issues facing older Ontarians. The Report presents an overview of what the Commission heard from over 100 organizations and individuals from across the province. It outlines recommendations for government and community action derived from the suggestions of the consultees, as well as “Commission Commitments”, - steps that the Commission will take toward eliminating ageism and age discrimination in the province of Ontario.
  8. Consultation paper: The changing face of Ontario - Discrimination and our aging population

    2000 - One of the objectives of this consultation is to solicit your views on a range of human rights issues faced by persons as they age. The Discussion Paper Discrimination and Age: Human Rights Issues Facing Older Persons in Ontario (the “Discussion Paper”) contains a detailed discussion of these issues and identifies priorities for further action by the Ontario Human Rights Commission (the “Commission”) in areas that fall within its mandate under the Ontario Human Rights Code (the “Code”).

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