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  1. OHRC granted party status in Lynwood Charlton Centre OMB appeal

    November 5, 2012

    In a decision on October 31, the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) granted the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) party status in the Lynwood Charlton Centre’s appeal of a decision by the City of Hamilton. The OHRC requested party status because of its concerns about human rights issues when the City turned down Lynwood Charlton’s request to move its housing for eight teenage girls with mental health issues.

  2. Submission of the Ontario Human Rights Commission to the Ministry of the Solicitor General on the proposed amendments to the segregation provisions in Regulation 778 under the Ministry of Correctional Services Act

    September 24, 2019

    On August 26, 2019, Ontario’s Ministry of the Solicitor General (the Ministry) announced proposed amendments to Regulation 778 under the Ministry of Correctional Services Act. The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) welcomes the opportunity to provide this submission on the amendments related to segregation.

  3. OHRC and corrections workers call for dedicated funding to address crisis in Ontario corrections

    January 21, 2020

    In an unprecedented joint submission the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) and OPSEU Corrections Management-Employee Relations Committee (MERC), which represents front line correctional staff, are calling on the Ontario government to dedicate funds in the 2020 Budget to address the crisis in Ontario’s correctional system.

  4. OHRC’s new policy will support law enforcement to eliminate racial profiling

    September 20, 2019

    Today, the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) released its new Policy on eliminating racial profiling in law enforcement at the Ontario Association of Chiefs of Police (OACP) CEOs Day. This policy, the first of its kind in Canada, offers practical guidance to help law enforcement identify and end racial profiling. The OACP is committed to the principles outlined in the policy, and more than 20 community and advocacy groups have added their support or endorsement.

  5. Interrupted childhoods: Over-representation of Indigenous and Black children in Ontario child welfare

    When child welfare authorities remove children from their caregivers because of concerns about abuse or neglect, it can be traumatic and tragic for everyone involved – children, their families and even their communities. Being admitted into care comes with far-reaching consequences that can have a negative impact on children’s future ability to thrive. It is an unfortunate reality that some children need to be placed in care to keep them safe. But too often, for First Nations, Métis, Inuit, Black and other racialized families, being involved with the child welfare system and having a child removed is fraught with concerns that the system is not meeting their or their children’s needs, is harmful, and may be discriminatory.