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  1. Re: Student housing can benefit a neighbourhood, Feb. 19

    February 21, 2014 – Thank you for pointing out that “student housing can benefit a neighbourhood.” The points you make about not applying different rules for students, and the need to focus on the character of a building instead of potential tenants, echo the human rights messages we have been sending across Ontario. Everyone – including students – has human rights in housing. Making decisions based on the “perceived desirability of the people who might want to live there” is not the way to build healthy, welcoming communities.

  2. Re: Information Report on the Lynwood Charlton Centre (CM12005)

    April 3, 2012

    Your Worship and Councillors, I am writing to restate my concerns about the human rights implications raised by the zoning application by the Lynwood Charlton Centre. As stated in my letter of January 24, 2012, applying the radial separation distance to this application makes one ask whether the City of Hamilton is creating discriminatory barriers for vulnerable people.

  3. Re: Report no. 14-29, Rental housing licensing recommended approach

    May 2, 2014

    I am writing in support of the steps that are recommended in Report no. 14-29 – that instead of putting a licensing system in place for rental housing, the City of Guelph use existing bylaws to deal with property concerns. Licensing can be a good tool if its focus is on Building Code, Fire Code and health and safety standards, but it is not an appropriate option for dealing with the actions of the people who may live in the housing. This is why we concur with the report’s recommendation to expand existing programs to target the actual problem areas, without adding an extra cost to tenants across the City.

  4. Re: Agenda items 7.(i) and 9.(vi): new comprehensive Zoning By-law, co-owned housing and communal dwellings

    March 17, 2014

    The OHRC provided guidance to the Township of Scugog about human rights principles relating to housing, as they considered amendments to their Zoning Bylaw relating to co-owned housing geared toward older Ontarians and people with disabilities. Following input from the community and the OHRC, the Township’s decision was to not create a special category, but treat the housing the same as any other residential housing.