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  1. OHRC wraps up inquiry into rental housing licensing in North Bay, publishes new guide on human rights and licensing

    May 8, 2013

    Toronto – The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) today released a report on its inquiry into rental housing licensing in the City of North Bay. The report outlines what the OHRC heard, identifies the City’s response to some concerns, gives recommendations for advancing human rights moving forward, and also refers to one part of the bylaw where human rights issues remain.

  2. Re: Applying a human rights lens in zoning, licensing and municipal decision-making

    February 25, 2015

    Dear Colleagues, As new and returning mayors, councillors and elected officials, you play a central role in ensuring that municipal processes and decisions respect the human rights of all community members. The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) has worked for several years with governments, experts and community partners to increase human rights compliance in housing, land use and licensing. I’m writing to share some positive developments in these areas, and to point out some OHRC resources that can help you make your community more inclusive.

  3. Policy on accessible education for students with disabilities


    The Ontario Human Rights Code  recognizes the importance of creating a climate of understanding and mutual respect for the dignity and worth of each person, so that each person can contribute fully to the development and well-being of the community and the Province. The Code guarantees the right to equal treatment in education, without discrimination on the ground of disability, as part of the protection for equal treatment in services.

    This Policy replaces the Guidelines on accessible education (2004).

  4. Policy and education branch - promotion and awareness of human rights

    From: Annual report 2000–2001

    Policy Development 

    In keeping with its mandate to promote greater understanding of human rights and encourage research to eliminate discriminatory practices, the Commission undertook a number of policy development initiatives in 2000-2001.

    The Commission held public meetings and issued discussion papers to the public and media on emerging human rights policy areas. New policies were introduced and several policies were updated.  The Commission also embarked on a major public education campaign.

  5. 4. Scope

    From: Minds that matter: Report on the consultation on human rights, mental health and addictions

    In defining our scope, we relied on a broad concept of disability, which reflects the Code and a social and human rights approach to disability. The human rights approach aims to achieve equality and inclusion for persons with disabilities by removing barriers and creating a climate of respect and understanding.[8] The social approach is supported by case law and is reflected in the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).

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