Language selector

Site

Search results

  1. Submission of the Ontario Human Rights Commission to the Ministry of the Solicitor General on the proposed amendments to the segregation provisions in Regulation 778 under the Ministry of Correctional Services Act

    September 24, 2019

    On August 26, 2019, Ontario’s Ministry of the Solicitor General (the Ministry) announced proposed amendments to Regulation 778 under the Ministry of Correctional Services Act. The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) welcomes the opportunity to provide this submission on the amendments related to segregation.

  2. Letter to Minister Lecce on Policy/Program Memorandum (PPM) No. 163 – School Board Policies on Service Animals

    September 30, 2019

    I trust this letter finds you well. On behalf of the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC), congratulations on your appointment as Minister of Education. In its 2017-2022 Strategic Plan, the OHRC identified education as a focus area and committed to identifying and addressing the systemic discrimination children and youth face in education.

  3. OHRC’s new policy will support law enforcement to eliminate racial profiling

    September 20, 2019

    Today, the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) released its new Policy on eliminating racial profiling in law enforcement at the Ontario Association of Chiefs of Police (OACP) CEOs Day. This policy, the first of its kind in Canada, offers practical guidance to help law enforcement identify and end racial profiling. The OACP is committed to the principles outlined in the policy, and more than 20 community and advocacy groups have added their support or endorsement.

  4. Human Rights system changes take effect

    June 30, 2008

    Toronto - The Human Rights Code Amendment Act, 2006, S.O. 2006, c. 30 is now in effect. As a result, the Ontario Human Rights Commission will no longer accept complaints of discrimination. All new applications alleging discrimination are to be filed with the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario (HRTO). Complaints that were filed with the Commission before June 30, 2008 can be changed to applications to the HRTO if the Complainant takes an active step to do so.

  5. Adjudication Boards Built Human Rights into Decisions

    June 18, 2009

    Toronto - Recent settlements of complaints with the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board and the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing show an emerging commitment to human rights, the Ontario Human Rights Commission reports. The settlements follow the Supreme Court of Canada decision in Tranchemontagne v. the Ministry of Community and Social Services. In that decision, the Court told the Social Benefits Tribunal to apply the Code to resolve the issue before it. The Supreme Court stressed the primacy of the Code over other Ontario laws, unless the legislation governing the body expressly states that the Code will not prevail.

Pages