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  1. Submission of the Ontario Human Rights Commission Concerning barrier-free access requirements in the Ontario Building Code

    March 2002 - This submission is in response to the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing’s (MAH) public consultation on the accessibility provisions of the Ontario Building Code (the “Building Code”). It has become increasingly clear to the Commission that the barrier-free requirements in the current Building Code have not been sufficient to achieve the degree of integration and full participation for persons with disabilities that is intended by the Ontario Human Rights Code (the “Human Rights Code”).
  2. 4. What are competing rights?

    From: Policy on competing human rights

    In general, competing human rights involve situations where parties to a dispute claim that the enjoyment of an individual or group’s human rights and freedoms, as protected by law, would interfere with another’s rights and freedoms. This complicates the normal approach to resolving a human rights dispute where only one side claims a human rights violation. In some cases, only one party is making a human rights claim, but the claim conflicts with the legal entitlements of another party or parties.

  3. Example 3 - Code right v. Code right: Muslim barber and woman denied service

    From: Competing Human Rights

    Muslim barber and woman denied service

    Read the following excerpt from a news clipping about a competing rights case. This is an example involving two Code grounds – creed versus sex. When you’re finished reading, answer the questions at the bottom of the page.

    You can also watch this CTV news video about the case.

  4. Example 7 - Code right v. Code right: Civil marriage commissioner and same-sex couple

    From: Competing Human Rights

    Civil marriage commissioner and same-sex couple

    A civil marriage commissioner objects to performing a marriage ceremony for a same-sex couple, claiming that it violates his religious beliefs. He claims that under the Code, he has the right to be free from discrimination based on religion in employment. The couple wishing to receive the service claims that their right under the Code to be free from discrimination because of sexual orientation in services is being breached.

  5. Example 2 - Code right v. Code right: Visual fire alarms and epilepsy

    From: Competing Human Rights

    Visual fire alarms and epilepsy

    Photo of a fire alarm

    Jan, a building manager, is updating the fire alarm system in his building. He installs audible alarms. He plans to also install visual alarms, to accommodate a resident who is deaf. A strobe light would be set off when fire alarms are activated, which alerts people with hearing impairments.

  6. Housing discrimination and the individual

    From: Right at home: Report on the consultation on human rights and rental housing in Ontario

    This section discusses the most significant rental housing issues affecting individual tenants and housing providers. Many of the experiences of discrimination and harassment, tenant screening and accommodation are intrinsically linked to the systemic elements discussed in section 5. For example, the individual barriers to housing experienced by tenants in receipt of social assistance are, in many cases, linked to the broader societal issues of inadequate income levels and poverty.

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