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Contracts

 

A contract is a legal agreement. It can be a written or verbal agreement. The right to enter into a contract on equal terms covers all steps in the contract, including the offer, acceptance, price or even rejecting a contract. The Code prohibits discrimination in all types of contracts, including contracts to buy a house or condominium or other housing agreements, and contracts for buying a business for a job or service.

For example, an automobile manufacturer cannot refuse to enter into a contract with the owner of a car dealership because the owner is gay.

  1. Count me in! Collecting human rights-based data

    2010 - This guide is intended to be a practical resource for human resources professionals, human rights and equity advisors, managers and supervisors, unions, and any other people or groups considering a data collection project, or seeking support to do so. This guide may be particularly helpful to readers with little or no knowledge of data collection. The guide will discuss the benefits of data collection, and will highlight key concepts and practical considerations for organizations thinking of gathering data on Code and non-Code grounds. Appendices A to F offer concrete examples of how non-profit, private and public-sector organizations have successfully developed and implemented data collection projects.
  2. Racism and racial discrimination: Organizational responsibility

    2005 - Employers, unions, educational facilities, service providers and other organizations covered by the Ontario Human Rights Code (the “Code”) are responsible for ensuring that their environments are free from racial discrimination and harassment. This means not just responding when issues of discrimination or harassment arise, but also taking proactive measures to monitor for and prevent their occurrence.
  3. How far does the duty to accommodate go? (fact sheet)

    2000 - Business inconvenience, resentment or hostility from other co-workers, the operation of collective agreements and customer "preferences" cannot be considered in the accommodation process. When a person with a disability needs supports in order to work, use a service or access housing, the employer, service provider or landlord has a duty to provide these supports. There are limits to this duty, and these limits are called undue hardship.

  4. Comment of the Ontario Human Rights Commission on the Provincial Policy Statement - 2005

    2010 - The Ontario Human Rights Commission (the OHRC) thanks the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing (MMAH) for the opportunity to comment on the Provincial Policy Statement, 2005 (PPS). The Province of Ontario (the Province) is requesting submissions as part of the five-year review of the PPS. The OHRC will focus its comments on sections that may have human rights implications, and in particular on elements that have implications for including or excluding people from Ontario Human Rights Code-protected groups.
  5. OHRC letter to the former Ontario Insurance Commission

    From: Discussion paper: Human rights issues in insurance

    November 28, 1997 - In accordance with PART IV, s.36 of the Ontario Insurance Commission’s (“the OIC”) Rules of Practice and Procedure for Commissioner, Superintendent and Advisory Board Hearings, the Ontario Human Rights Commission (“the Commission”) submits this letter of comment with respect to the public hearing to be held on an application filed by (the insurer) for an automobile insurance classification system and automobile insurance rates.
  6. Contracts

    From: Guide to your rights and responsibilities under the Human Rights Code

    Every person having legal capacity has a right to contract on equal terms without discrimination because of any Code ground.

    A contract is a legal agreement. It can be a written or verbal agreement.

    The right to enter into a contract on equal terms covers all steps in the contract, including the offer, acceptance, price or even rejection of a contract. The Code covers all types of contracts, including contracts to buy a house, condominium or other type of residential accommodation, and contracts for buying a business, such as office or retail space.

  7. Restrictions for insurance contracts

    From: Guide to your rights and responsibilities under the Human Rights Code

    There is an exception to the rule that services and contracts must be offered without discrimination. This section allows insurance providers to make distinctions based on age, sex, marital and family status or disability when they offer individual accident, sickness or disability insurance or group insurance (not part of an employment situation). However, these distinctions must be made on reasonable and genuine grounds.

  8. Discrimination in employment under government contracts

    From: Guide to your rights and responsibilities under the Human Rights Code

    The right to freedom from discrimination in employment applies to government contracts or subcontracts. This right applies to government agency contracts also.

    The right to be free from discrimination in employment applies to carrying out government grants, contributions, loans or guarantees. This right also applies to government agencies.

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