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Housing

Use of the term “accommodation” refers to housing. You have the right to equal treatment when buying, selling, renting or being evicted from an apartment, house, condominium or commercial property. This right also covers renting or being evicted from a hotel room. 

The Code applies to terms and conditions in contracts and leases such as the amount of rent, security deposits, the requirement of guarantors, occupants’ rules and regulations, lease termination and eviction. Your right to housing without discrimination also includes suitable access to doors, laundry rooms, swimming pools, other common areas, repairs and other aspects of housing.
 
The Code does not apply if you have a “personality conflict” with the landlord or another tenant that is not linked to a Code ground. Also, the Code does not apply if you share a bathroom or kitchen with the owner or the owner’s family.
 
The Code also applies to municipalities, as both regulators and providers of housing. They must ensure that their bylaws, processes and decisions do not target or disproportionately affect groups relating to a Code ground. 
 
OHRC policies, guides and other publications include:
 
On human rights and rental housing:

For other publications on housing, click “Resource Types” on the left-hand panel.

  1. RE: Proposed North Bay Rental Housing Licensing By-law

    June 28, 2011 - Over the past two years, the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) has monitored and reviewed rental housing licensing bylaws in various municipalities. Rental housing licensing is a relatively new option for municipalities, and our goal has been to make sure that these bylaws, even unintentionally, do not create barriers and discrimination in housing for vulnerable people who are protected under the grounds of the Ontario Human Rights Code (the Code).
  2. Re: Student housing can benefit a neighbourhood, Feb. 19

    February 21, 2014 – Thank you for pointing out that “student housing can benefit a neighbourhood.” The points you make about not applying different rules for students, and the need to focus on the character of a building instead of potential tenants, echo the human rights messages we have been sending across Ontario. Everyone – including students – has human rights in housing. Making decisions based on the “perceived desirability of the people who might want to live there” is not the way to build healthy, welcoming communities.

  3. Re: Submission of the Ontario Human Rights Commission on Bill 21, an Act to regulate retirement homes

    May 14, 2010 - The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) supports the regulation of retirement homes across the province. However, we ask the Committee to consider specific recommendations to amend the Bill to enhance the ability of retirement homes providers to meet their obligations under the Ontario Human Rights Code (Code)
  4. Recommendations to strengthen the National Housing Strategy

    May 18, 2018 - Dear Minister Duclos and President Siddall: I trust this letter finds you well. The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) is committed to bringing a human rights perspective to government and community strategies aimed at addressing poverty, homelessness and hunger. I am writing today to commend the Government for introducing Canada’s first National Housing Strategy, and to make recommendations to ensure that it is meaningful, effective, and meets Canada’s obligation to progressively realize the fundamental human right to housing.

  5. Rental housing licensing Inquiries

     

    Two public interest inquiries by the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) will explore if new rental housing licensing bylaws in North Bay and Waterloo create discriminatory barriers to rental housing. The inquiries are being conducted under the OHRC’s Human Rights Code mandate to promote, advance and protect human rights in Ontario.

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