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Example 4 - Code right v. Charter right: Employer distributing Bibles and religious advice

From: Competing Human Rights

Employer distributing Bibles and religious advice

Here is an example of a Code right (creed) versus a Charter right (freedom of religion and expression).

encourages them to attend church meetings, gives each a Bible as a gift for Christmas and asks them if they share his opinions on a variety of matters. Employees have made it clear that they do not welcome or appreciate his comments and conduct in their workplace and that they plan to file a claim under the Ontario Human Rights Code. This could be argued as a competing rights situation because:

Example 3 - Code right v. Code right: Muslim barber and woman denied service

From: Competing Human Rights

Muslim barber and woman denied service

Read the following excerpt from a news clipping about a competing rights case. This is an example involving two Code grounds – creed versus sex. When you’re finished reading, answer the questions at the bottom of the page.

You can also watch this CTV news video about the case.

OHRC policy position on sexualized and gender-specific dress codes

March 8, 2016 - Some Ontario employers require female employees to dress in a sexualized or gender-specific way at work, such as expecting women to wear high heels, short skirts, tight clothing or low-cut tops. These kinds of dress codes reinforce stereotypical and sexist notions about how women should look and may violate Ontario’s Human Rights Code.

Honouring Holocaust victims is an important reminder of work left to do to eradicate racism

January 27, 2016

Observing the UN International Day of Commemoration in memory of the Victims of the Holocaust

Today is the International Day of Commemoration in Memory of the Victims of the Holocaust. It’s a day to remember the genocide that resulted in the murder of millions of Jewish people in World War Two, along with the systematic killing of people with disabilities, Roma persons, and many other minority groups across Europe and Asia.

Updated creed policy gives guidance on protecting rights

December 10, 2015

Toronto – The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) today releases an updated Policy on preventing discrimination based on creed. The OHRC introduced its first policy on creed in 1996. Since that time, Ontario society has grown increasingly more diverse and there have been many important legal and social developments. The update reflects today’s issues and changes to case law, and provides expanded information in areas like Indigenous Spirituality and creed-based profiling.

History teaches us that difficult conversations about religion must start from respect and inclusion, not hate and division

December 10, 2015

Today is International Human Rights Day—the day the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The human rights movement was a direct response to widespread antisemitism which ultimately led to the Holocaust. By adopting the Universal Declaration in 1948, Canada and the international community rightly said, “Never again.”

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