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The human rights of Indigenous people in Ontario (including status, non-status, First Nations, Métis and Inuit) are protected by the all Code grounds. However, discrimination because a person identifies as Indigenous involve the grounds of race, creed and ancestry.

OHRC settlement addresses harmful impact of stereotypes on Indigenous youth

December 13, 2018

Toronto – After the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario invited the OHRC to intervene in the case of Gallant v Mississauga, the OHRC reached a settlement with the City of Mississauga and the Applicant, Bradley Gallant. The settlement addresses the harmful impact of stereotypes on Indigenous youth by requiring Mississauga to remove from its sports facilities all Indigenous-themed mascots, symbols, names and imagery related to non-Indigenous sports organizations.

To dream together: Indigenous peoples and human rights dialogue report

This report summarizes key points of the discussion and recommendations arising from the three-day Indigenous Peoples and Human Rights Dialogue. It features the collective wisdom of Indigenous Elders, knowledge keepers, academics, political and government leaders, advocates, lawyers, policy makers and activists. Representatives of the OHRC, Human Rights Legal Support Centre, Social Justice Tribunals of Ontario, and the Canadian Human Rights Commission also took part.

Interrupted childhoods: Over-representation of Indigenous and Black children in Ontario child welfare

When child welfare authorities remove children from their caregivers because of concerns about abuse or neglect, it can be traumatic and tragic for everyone involved – children, their families and even their communities. Being admitted into care comes with far-reaching consequences that can have a negative impact on children’s future ability to thrive. It is an unfortunate reality that some children need to be placed in care to keep them safe. But too often, for First Nations, Métis, Inuit, Black and other racialized families, being involved with the child welfare system and having a child removed is fraught with concerns that the system is not meeting their or their children’s needs, is harmful, and may be discriminatory.

Indigenous Peoples and human rights dialogue: Chief Commissioner's remarks

The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC), in collaboration with Indigenous knowledge keepers, Elders, academics and organizations, the Canadian Race Relations Foundation, Osgoode Hall Law School of York University, and the University of Toronto Faculty of Law, hosted “Indigenous Peoples and human rights: A dialogue” at the Native Canadian Centre of Toronto from February 21-23, 2018.

Call for contributions: Indigenous Peoples and human rights

Oct. 30, 2017 - From February 21 to 23, 2018, the Ontario Human Rights Commission and Osgoode Hall Law School of York University, in collaboration with Indigenous knowledge keepers, academics and organizations, will host and engage in a dialogue to explore both Indigenous and Western constitutional legal and policy approaches to “human rights” and “equality.” Event organizers include staff from the Chiefs of Ontario as well as Indigenous academics Karen Drake (Métis Nation of Ontario, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University) and Jeffery Hewitt (Cree, Faculty of Law, University of Windsor).

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