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duty to accommodate

Housing

From: Human rights and the family in Ontario

The ground of family status was added to the Code in 1982. Until 1986, the Code contained an exception permitting residential buildings or parts of residential buildings to be designated as adult only. Unlike in the areas of employment and services, there has been significant litigation regarding family status issues in the area of housing, particularly in the Ontario context.

Employment

From: Human rights and the family in Ontario

Employment and family often entail competing responsibilities: spouses or partners fall sick, daycare arrangements fall through, an aging parent needs help in making a transition to assisted living arrangements. For many workers, daily life involves a complicated juggling act between the demands, deadlines and responsibilities of the workplace, and the needs of their families.

VIII. Roles and responsibilities

From: The cost of caring: Report on the consultation on discrimination on the basis of family status

The ground of family status raises wide-ranging and complex issues. It is clear from this consultation that individuals with caregiving responsibilities face a range of systemic barriers to full participation in employment, housing and services. The Commission heard that families cannot, on their own, resolve all of these barriers. Addressing them will require a coordinated approach from government, employers, housing providers, service providers, and the Commission itself.

Section IV: Using the tools

From: Balancing conflicting rights: Towards an analytical framework

A number of conflicting rights scenarios and their potential resolutions have been presented throughout this paper in order to illustrate specific balancing tools. This section of the paper will utilize each of the tools noted above by working through one timely example of conflicting rights: same-sex marriage and civil marriage commissioners. This example has been chosen not only for its currency, but also because it encompasses both the service and employment contexts.

Accommodation planning

From: Guidelines on accessible education

As part of the duty to accommodate, education providers are responsible for taking steps to plan for the accommodation of students with disabilities. Effective planning will take place both on an organizational level and on an individual level in relation to each student with accommodation needs. Individual planning should also address the transition needs of a student as he or she moves from one level or type of education to another.

Appendix A: Summary of actions required

From: The opportunity to succeed: Achieving barrier-free education for students with disabilities

School Boards and Schools

  1. Make all classroom materials (handouts, etc.) available in alternative formats in a timely manner.
  2.  Review local level practices to determine ways in which accommodation can be provided in a more timely manner.
  3. Decide their curriculum book lists in a timely fashion so that alternative formats may be arranged for students with disabilities.
  4. Provide interim accommodation for students pending the completion of professional assessments.

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